Lack of Sleep is at Epidemic Proportions... Causing All Sorts Of Mental, Emotional and Physical Issues!

What Would You Do To Get A Good 8 Hours Sleep

If you struggle to get out of bed in the morning, you’re not alone and lack of sleep has got to be one of the worst feelings ever. I guess you know this or you would not be here reading.

You know your body needs sleep, just as it needs air and food to function at its best. During sleep, your body heals itself and restores its chemical balance. Your brain creates new connections and helps memory retention. Without enough sleep, your brain and body systems don’t function normally. which impacts on your quality of life in areas such as:

No time for the kids and family

Feelings of agitation

Lack of focus and concentration

To be honest, that's enough, the list appears to be endless as health experts are now sounding alarm bells and warning of the detrimental effect sleep deprivation can have on long-term overall health and well being.

Almost half of British women (43%) and (35%) men say they are not getting enough sleep. In fact, 45% do not feel well-rested when they wake up... That's an epidemic amount.

The results are part of the ‘Reclaim Your Sleep’ survey conducted by YouGov and supported by the Sleep Apnoea Trust Association (SATA).

 

Of over 15,000 people surveyed these were the top annoyances that either woke them or kept them awake at night... And this is only your partner!

And this is just your partner, but we know there are many other reasons for not getting a good nights sleep that can include, stress and anxiety, pain, diet, medication, irregular work hours... to name a few.

How Does Sound Therapy Work With Sleep Problems

First We Need An Understanding Of What The Brain Does When It Sleeps

Contrary to popular belief, sleep is not passive — your brain is actually working hard. Whilst lying there, it tries to progress through a series of important steps, all of which are crucial to your mental and emotional health. This is called a sleep cycle.

These stages are linked to what are known as brainwave states and an "electroencephalogram" (EEG) measures the electrical brain activity to determine what brainwave states we enter during sleep.

If you look at the diagram opposite you will see that the ideal is to move from Gamma/Beta and through calming the mind, drop the brainwaves down to Aplha/Theta/Delta. Once there, you move between these 3 states during sleep and get the rest and rejuvenation that you need.

However, if we can't relax and have nagging thoughts and fears going on, then we tend to stay in Beta and therefore lie there processing these thoughts and driving ourselves crazy as we try to force ourselves to sleep by counting sheep, breathing or visualising. However if are brainwaves don't drop to the lower states, then it becomes a wasted exercise, that often makes us even more frustrated and less likely to sleep.

What is Brainwave Entrainment

Brainwave entrainment is a method to stimulate the brain into entering a specific state by using a pulsing sound, light, or electromagnetic field. The pulses elicit the brain’s ‘frequency following’ response, encouraging the brainwaves to align to the frequency of a given beat.

This ‘frequency following’ response of brainwave entrainment can be seen in action with those prone to epilepsy. If a strobe flashes at their seizure frequency, the brain will ‘entrain’ to the flashing light, resulting in a seizure.

On the positive side, this same mechanism is commonly used to induce many brainwave states; such as a trance, enhanced focus, relaxation, meditation or sleep induction. The brainwave entrainment effectively pushes the entire brain into a certain state.

Brainwave entrainment works for almost everyone. It is a great way to lead your mind into states that you might usually have difficulty reaching, allowing you to experience what those states feel like.

Read More About Brainwave States For Sleep +

The Brainwave States

Gamma brainwaves (38 to 42 Hz) are the fastest of brain waves (high frequency, like a flute), and relate to simultaneous processing of information from different brain areas. It passes information rapidly, and as the most subtle of the brainwave frequencies the mind has to be quiet to access it. Gamma was dismissed as 'spare brain noise' until researchers discovered it was highly active when in states of universal love, altruism, and the ‘higher virtues’. Gamma is also above the frequency of neuronal firing, so how it is generated remains a mystery. It is speculated that Gamma rhythms modulate perception and consciousness, and that a greater presence of Gamma relates to expanded consciousness and spiritual emergence.

Beta waves  (12 to 38 Hz) dominate our normal waking state of consciousness when attention is directed towards cognitive tasks and the outside world. Beta is a ‘fast’ activity, present when we are alert, attentive, engaged in problem solving, judgment, decision making, and engaged in focused mental activity.Alpha waves are dominant during quietly flowing thoughts, and in some meditative states. Alpha is ‘the power of now’, being here, in the present. Alpha is the resting state for the brain. Alpha waves aid overall mental coordination, calmness, alertness, mind/body integration and learning.

Beta brainwaves are further divided into three bands; Lo-Beta (Beta1, 12-15Hz) can be thought of as a 'fast idle, or musing. Beta (Beta2, 15-22Hz) is high engagement or actively figuring something out. Hi-Beta (Beta3, 22-38Hz) is highly complex thought, integrating new experiences, high anxiety, or excitement. Continual high frequency processing is not a very efficient way to run the brain, as it takes a tremendous amount of energy.

Theta waves (3 to 8 Hz) occur most often in sleep but are also dominant in deep meditation. It acts as our gateway to learning and memory. In theta, our senses are withdrawn from the external world and focused on signals originating from within. It is that twilight state which we normally only experience fleetingly as we wake or drift off to sleep. In theta we are in a dream; vivid imagery, intuition and information beyond our normal conscious awareness. It’s where we hold our ‘stuff’, our fears, troubled history, and nightmares.

Delta waves (.5 to 3 Hz) brainwaves are slow, loud brainwaves (low frequency and deeply penetrating, like a drum beat). They are generated in deepest meditation and dreamless sleep. Delta waves suspend external awareness and are the source of empathy. Healing and regeneration are stimulated in this state, and that is why deep restorative sleep is so essential to the healing process.

Infra low waves (<.5HZ) Infra-Low brainwaves (also known as Slow Cortical Potentials), are thought to be the basic cortical rythms that underlie our higher brain functions. Very little is known about infra-low brainwaves. Their slow nature make them difficult to detect and accurately measure, so few studies have been done. They appear to take a major role in brain timing and network function.

The Different Sound Therapy Technologies That Will Help With Sleep

Lets take an overview of the different types of machines

White Noise Machines

In simple terms, white noise is a special type of sound signal with a full spectrum of frequencies which is used to mask background sounds. When used to promote healthy sleep, white noise helps to drown out sounds which might otherwise prevent you from either falling asleep or waking up whilst asleep.

The Best White Noise Machines With White Noise Only

White Noise Machines With a Range of Natural Sounds